LED Lights: Can They Interfere With Your TV Reception?

LED LIGHTS & TV INTERFERENCE

Many of our Jim’s Antennas technicians have seen a spike in digital television interference that may be caused by some models of LED light globes. This may also be the case for digital radio reception. If you experience a sudden loss of signal or picture quality, it may be that LED light globes in your residence or neighbouring residences is the cause. Naturally, such interference is likely to occur during evening hours when light globes are actively in use.

HOW DO I KNOW LED LIGHT GLOBES ARE THE CAUSE OF INTERFERENCE?

Our Jim’s Antennas technicians provide the following advice:

When your television reception is affected by interference, immediately switch any and all LED lights off. If the signal immediately returns to normal this is a strong indicator that the LED light globe(s) is the source of the interference.

The problem that you may encounter is that the source of the interference may be coming from a neighbouring home so if your television is still affected after turning of your own LED light globe(s), you will need to check with your neighbours as well.

If the light globes appear to be the cause you should return them to the place of purchase or contact the manufacturer directly.

WHAT IF LED LIGHT GLOBES ARE NOT THE CAUSE?

Our Jim’s Antennas technicians note that there are other many other possible causes for signal loss. These include faulty antenna, cabling or damaged antennas. In these cases, you may need to seek assistance from one of our professional and highly trained technicians. We can be contacted on 1300 733 093 and offer a free onsite signal check.

If the cause of the interference is not able to be identified then a government body known as the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) can be requested to further investigate. A Jim’s Antennas technician will assist by completing a form known as a ‘TV Interference Request for Investigation’ form. The technician will note his signal meter readings and observations and then the ACMA will determine whether an investigation is required.